Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in acute myeloid leukaemia

Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in acute myeloid leukaemia

Project details

Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer that is difficult to treat successfully. Thus, understanding the escape mechanism by which leukaemic cells acquire resistance to chemotherapies, including the group of new anti-cancer drugs the Smac-mimetics, is crucial for the development of better therapies for AML. In this project we will use state-of-art proteomics and genomics technologies to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in Smac-mimetic mediated resistance and explore new strategies to bypass treatment failure. Our studies aim to identify the patients who can benefit the most from treatment with Smac-mimetics, and the reasons why some patients may not respond.

About our research group

Our research group has had a long and successful interest in developing and using Smac-mimetic compounds to understand how inflammatory signalling and Smac-mimetics can be used to treat cancer. We use many different tools and techniques both in vitro and in vivo and work together with other basic scientists and clinicians to complement our work and thereby to help achieve our goal of translating Smac-mimetics effectively into the clinic.

Researchers:

Professor John Silke

John Silke
Professor
John
Silke
Joint Division Head

Project Type: