WHO Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control

WHO Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control

WHO Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control

WEHI has been designated as the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control.

Our anaemia researchers will support the WHO on the best approaches to diagnose and treat anaemia, including preventing iron deficiency.

A global problem

Smiling family
A mother and her children in Bangladesh, where WEHI
is leading studies into the use of iron supplements to
prevent anaemia in mothers and children.

Two billion people worldwide – including around a million Australians – are anaemic, meaning they have abnormally low levels of oxygen-carrying red blood cells or haemoglobin in their blood. Anaemia is especially prevalent in low-income countries.

Anaemia can have serious short- and long-term health consequences. These include fatigue, heart problems and susceptibility to certain infections such as malaria. Anaemia in pregnant women or young children can increase their susceptibility to pregnancy-associated complications, and can cause long-term developmental problems for the child.

Iron deficiency is the main cause of anaemia, but both conditions can be caused by a range of other health issues including cancer, inflammatory conditions and coeliac disease. Reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency is critical for many of the WHO’s Global Targets 2025, particularly around improving women’s and children’s health.

Improving health by combatting anaemia

The WHO Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control enlists WEHI researchers into the WHO’s efforts to reduce anaemia. Our researchers provide the most up-to-date, evidence-based advice to WHO, to ensure global programs to combat anaemia are effective and relevant to the unique circumstances of different countries.

Smiling researcher
Associate Professor Sant-Rayn Pasricha

The WHO Collaborating Centre for Anaemia Detection and Control is led by Associate Professor Sant-Rayn Pasricha, a clinician-scientist and haematologist.

Associate Professor Pasricha leads international trials of iron interventions as a treatment for iron-deficiency anaemia in low-income countries. His laboratory also investigates how iron levels are controlled at the molecular level.

 

Learn more about WEHI’s anaemia research

Super Content: 
Two researchers smiling at the camera

Institute researchers have launched one of the largest international efforts to prevent and treat maternal anaemia in developing countries.

The study will also investigate the impacts of iron deficiency on the developing infant brain.